Frequently Asked Questions » Vaccinating Your Dog and Cat

Vaccinating your dog and cat

Vaccination is an essential way of keeping pets happy and healthy. Animals that aren't protected can become seriously ill from infectious diseases. Although these diseases are less common now, it is important to protect them from potential outbreaks. Treatment for the disease is often expensive and may not be successful. Our motto is prevention is better than cure!

Dogs

Dogs can be vaccinated from 8 weeks of age and then a 2nd vaccine is required 2-4 weeks later. This is the initial vaccination course and from then on a booster is recommended every 12 months to keep them covered.

Vaccines may be split into 2 categories:

Core Vaccines

When your dog is vaccinated they are protected against the following:

 

 

Non-Core vaccines

It is transmitted via the saliva of infected animals and a bite from the host is the most likely and common way for an animal or person to contract rabies. Symptoms are variable in animals but the first signs of rabies include behavioural changes such as restlessness, anxiety and a dislike to sights and sounds. These symptoms progress on to extreme aggression, disorientation and the animal may have seizures. In the later stages, rabies causes paralysis, excess salivation and respiratory distress. Sadly, death soon follows.

Fortunately the UK and Republic of Ireland have been RABIES FREE since 1922

For more information on rabies and taking your pet abroad go to www.defra.gov.uk

Cats

We also recommend that cats are routinely vaccinated and this can be done from 9 weeks of age with a second vaccine done at 3-4 weeks later. Boosters should also then be repeated every 12 months.

Vaccines may be split into:

When your cat is vaccinated they are protected against the following:

Core Vaccines:

 

 

Non-Core Vaccines:

It is transmitted via the saliva of infected animals and a bite from the host is the most likely and common way for an animal or person to contract rabies. Symptoms are variable in animals but the first signs of rabies include behavioural changes such as restlessness, anxiety and a dislike to sights and sounds. These symptoms progress on to extreme aggression, disorientation and the animal may have seizures. In the later stages, rabies causes paralysis, excess salivation and respiratory distress. Sadly, death soon follows.

Fortunately the UK and Republic of Ireland have been RABIES FREE since 1922

For more information on rabies and taking your pet abroad go to www.defra.gov.uk

Older Animals

Immunity can decline as animals get older so it is just as important to keep up to date with yearly boosters.

The leukaemia vaccination may not be required in older cats and the vet will discuss this with you during your consultation